Posts Tagged ‘Identity theft’

Identity Theft Tips For The Holidays

Wednesday, November 22nd, 2017

Avoid Identity Theft this holiday season by following these easy tips.

Hold your mail if traveling.

You see, Identity thieves are still up to their old tricks. The holiday season is when people travel. Leaving their mailboxes unattended. Identity thieves know this so they are out hitting mailboxes if there are any signs that you are gone. Think about it, if you have a weeks worth of mail sitting in your mailbox it is very likely that there is enough info in there for someone to steal your identity. Bank statements, credit card statements, etc. Also, a full mailbox and an empty driveway are an open invitation for burglary.Luckily the USPS has a hold mail service, just go to https://holdmail.usps.com/holdmail/ and request that your carrier “hold” your mail until your return date. Or just leave a note for your carrier in your mailbox.

 

If ordering online, invest in a door camera.

Parcel Pirates are out there. These guys follow delivery trucks around and straight up steal your parcels right off of your porch. Right in the middle of the day and get away with it. As a mail carrier myself, I highly recommend getting a doorbell/front door camera. I have seen these thieves get busted just by posting the footage of the thief on your local community facebook site. In most cases though, a home is less likely to be targeted just because the system is present.

 

Sign up for an identity monitoring service.

 

Yes, and finally the Identity Monitoring service. It’s time people. Identity monitoring services are now a necessity. With the data breaches, the skimmers, the ever evolving tactics for compromising your personal information. You definitely need LifeLock. I have it, I recommend it, and you know my story. While they cannot defend or prevent all identity theft, they find the warning signs way faster than you could, and they help resolve the issues quickly. Start your membership today, right here, and get 10% off.

Equifax Breach Update

Sunday, October 29th, 2017

oct.5 2007

So, Richard Smith, the now ex-CEO of Equifax had to answer some questions. He got questioned by a few different committees. Here’s what we know……….

Yes, equifax did get hacked back in May or June of this year.

Yes, it was over 143,000,000 people’s information.

Yes, they claim that they did not know about these hacks until July.

Yes, they waited until September to release the information that they had been hacked.

Yes, they did offer FREE Credit Monitoring through Trusted ID for 1 year.

Yes, Equifax owns Trusted ID.

Yes, after your FREE year at Trusted ID, it goes up to 17.00 a month.

Yes, Richard (A.K.A. DICK) Smith was quoted from a speech given in August( after being hacked, but before telling anyone) as saying that the best thing that could happen for Equifax is if they would be hacked, so that they could sell their credit monitoring service.

Yes, unbelievably, the IRS just gave Equifax a huge no-bid contract to verify Identities in the upcoming tax season.

You can not make this stuff up people. Things are only going to get crazier from here. These identities will start being used soon. Some in ways that are not going to be detectable by the run of the mill credit monitoring services. Criminal Identity theft, synthetic ID theft, immigration identity theft, tax fraud. These can only be detected by an Identity Monitoring service. Between this breach, the data breach at the VA, Yahoo, hospitals, insurance companies, your mail, hacked websites, etc. etc. It is almost  certain that if you are an adult, your identity will be stolen in the next 5 years.

I personally use LifeLock. I have a relationship with LifeLock. I believe that LifeLock is a necessity. Join now by clicking the banner below. You deserve peace of mind about this. Look, I know that nobody can prevent all Identity Theft. But LifeLock will detect it faster, they will notify you, they will help you fix it.


EQUIFAX DATA BREACH AFFECTS MILLIONS

Saturday, September 9th, 2017

For those that haven’t heard, there has been another major security breach. First it was the VA, which affected many veterans. Then Yahoo, who many many people use for their email, and it stole ID’s and passwords. There has been more than a few. But this most recent one takes the cake. Equifax got hacked. Yes, Equifax, one of the big 3 credit reporting agencies. They were hacked. You would think that they of all people would have the best cyber security available in the world. Apparently not.

 So here’s the deal. An estimated 140-150 million, yes I said million, people’s information were obtained by a hack into the Equifax website. The information obtained were names, social security numbers, date of birth, address, and in some cases even driver’s license information. In the cases of over 200,000 people, their credit card information was also obtained. That is just ridiculous. But wait, it gets even better…

   This news was just released yesterday, I believe. Guess when it happened? They are estimating that it happened some time in either May or June. They’ve known for months. But, we are just finding out now? Ya’ll know how I feel about Identity Theft.

   How is Equifax fixing it? Well, they are giving you a year of free credit monitoring. That’s great, except that my information stays with me for the rest of my life. I’m sure Equifax gets some kind of kick-back from the renewals after the one year free period is up, if they don’t flat out own the credit monitoring service itself. You probably have to sign something saying that you won’t participate in a class action law-suit against Equifax to receive the free monitoring. Or, you can put a freeze on your credit. Which can be done through Equifax itself for only $10.00.

   My suggestion? First, find an Identity Monitoring Service, not a credit monitoring service. The hackers don’t just have to use your information for Credit or Financial gains. Look at me, the guy who stole my identity put 7 felonies on my record. I didn’t even know about it for years, then it took me years longer to finally get it MOSTLY off of my record. Long story (goodnamegone.com) and I’ll never fully recover. Your Identity could be used for many things: IRS fraud, immigration fraud, criminal identity theft,etc. After my incident, I chose Lifelock. I personally got the ultimate plus plan, that one comes with an app that gives you alerts on unusual or over-limit spending and gives you your credit score as well. Plus the comfort of knowing that if my identity gets stolen again Lifelock will fight for me to get it all cleared up as speedily as possible. I regret that I did not have them before.

   The good thing is, at the moment your information has only been compromised and most likely not used yet. Get yourself signed up with an Identity Monitoring Service. Find out if you were one of the ones compromised. Please. You don’t want the Identity Theft nightmare with nobody in your corner. No, they can not STOP all identity theft, nobody can, but they will help you identify it quicker and help you repair your situation. You won’t go through it alone.

Lifelock actually allows me to offer a discount on my page.

 

 

 Sign up for Lifelock today to protect your identity from data breaches.

 

Identity Theft Checklist

Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

  

UNBELIEVABLE!!!!!

Did you know? As much as 20% of all adults in America fell victim to some sort of Identity Theft in 2013? That is insane. That is 1 in 5. That means that unless you are a total recluse, you know somebody that has fallen victim to some sort of Identity Theft, or even a few people. You might have even been a victim yourself. Look, I know what you are thinking. It would never happen to you, RIGHT? Don’t be so sure. I was a victim for over 6 years before I even knew it. NO JOKE!! And to top it all off, mine was Criminal Identity Theft, the kind where someone else’s crimes end up on your Criminal Background Check. Yep, 7 felonies including Capitol Murder. Over 5000 hours spent trying to clear my name and to be honest with you, even though I have taken all of the necessary steps, some of the crimes still show up on my Criminal Background Check. But enough about me, if you are really that interested my story is all over the internet and all over this website. Just search “John Shelby Identity Theft”.

Do you still think that you are safe? Or are you starting to wonder? Well, here’s a little checklist to know if your Identity is at risk of being stolen or compromised:

IDENTITY THEFT CHECKLIST

1. Do you ever bank online?

 

2. Are you prior military with a VA file?

 

3. Are you on any form of social media?

 

4. Have any of your email accounts ever been “hacked”?

 

5. Have you ever lost or mis-placed your smart-phone, laptop, or other mobile device?

 

6. Did you shop at Target or Nordstrom’s this last holiday season?

 

7. Have you ever received a letter from your bank, hospital, or anyone else notifying you of a security breach? (if you have, 1 in 4 of the recipients of that letter were victims)

 

8. Have you ever been arrested for any reason? That’s how they got me, and my case was dismissed without even having to go to court.

 

9. Shop online?

 

10. Ever lost your wallet or checkbook?

 

11. Ever left your mail in the mailbox overnight? Or even for a weekend retreat? CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

I would bet that you answered “YES” to at least 1-3 of these. If that is the case, then your identity is at risk. It’s not your fault really. These Identity Thieves are tricky and it really is virtually undefendable. But it sure is a lot of heartache for the victims. The time you have to put in just to fix your credit or reputation is crazy. The average is somewhere around 300 hours of leg-work. And it is so frustrating.

 

That is why Identity Monitoring services are popping up everywhere. It has become a big business, but a necessary one, unfortunately.

 

If you know me or more story, then you know that I have been on a mission to warn others and make people aware of Identity Theft and its effects. For many years it ruined my life. Homelessness, depression, embarrassment, struggles upon struggles. So, I have teamed up with the industry leader LifeLock, and I am proud to say that I have. Oh, I did my research. Admittedly, LifeLock can not protect you from all Identity Theft, but they will catch it early if it happens to you. On top of that, they will do all of the leg-work for you to clear matters up. They have a team of attorneys that specialize in Identity Theft protection and repair, all at your disposal.

 


Background Checks Cause Problems For Employment

Thursday, September 22nd, 2011

It does happen:

You go in for a job interview. You feel like you nailed it. Then you get the call (if you’re lucky) letting you know that your background check showed something shocking. They don’t know what to believe, they go with someone else. Then you get to start on that horrendous journey of clearing your name.

And this is all best case scenario. More often than not you do not get the call. Human resource professionals are going to believe what they see on this “official” background check. They are more than likely never going to contact you again after seeing that document. You go on knowing nothing about what is being reported on you Criminal Background Check, having no opportunity to explain yourself or begin fixing it. As I have said before in previous posts, it took me 6 years to find out, a few more to correct the problem by getting an expuncture, and a few years later I just turned up “dirty” on another background check.

Identity Theft of this nature is no joke, and it just blind-sides you. You can’t find out through your bank account or credit score. You are more than likely not going to run a Criminal Background Check on yourself. People that do know are probably not going to tell you, but they will probably tell others. In my case there was nothing that I could have done to prevent it, but in most cases it can be prevented. For great prevention tips click here

Because of my own experience, I am happy to endorse LifeLock. In turn, LifeLock has allowed me to offer a 10% discount to anyone that I refer to them. All you have to do is click on the Lifelock banner at the bottom of this page. I assure you, even though it might be a little too late for me, I now have my whole family enrolled in Lifelock. I recommend it to all of my friends. They have packages starting at as little as $10.00 a month. Do your own research, but please protect yourself, you can’t afford not to.

“LifeLock”
“Relentlessly Protecting Your Identity”

Do you think that Identity Theft really stinks?

Like us on facebook…

http://www.facebook.com/pages/ID-Theft-Stinks/128300927227769

Thank you NBC San Diego for doing such a great job with this important report.

P.S. Do I really look that old?

Identity Theft… Are you a victim? Are you sure?

Friday, June 24th, 2011

Are you a victim of Identity Theft?


ARE YOU SURE?


6 YEARS!

That’s how long I was a victim and did not even know it. Oh, I had been notified only a few months after it had originally happened….

By being fired from my job!

I went through all of the steps that I knew of to get it cleared up. Was told my record was cleared, even given documentation. Little did I know that not only had my record not been cleared, but it had gotten worse.

Hi, My name is John Shelby.

If you have done any research into the world of Identity Theft or to be more specific “Criminal Identity Theft”, then you have probably come across my story. If you listen to talk radio, I am the “Mr. X” that Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, and Glenn Beck refer to in their commercials. If not, here are a few glimpses into my personal nightmare…..

http://www.ktsm.com/news/full-story-identity-theft-ruins-mans-employment-chances

Six whole years went by without me even knowing. I knew that I had trouble finding a decent job. I knew that in the darkest of times, I was living on the streets. I knew that I felt like a failure. I knew that there was a dark cloud following me around. I really thought that God was punishing me for something.

What I didn’t know is that my Criminal Background Check was showing that I had been convicted of multiple felonies. Robbery, possession of a stolen vehicle, evading police, participation in organized criminal activity, and last but not least Capital Murder. What I didn’t know was that there were warrants out for my arrest. What I didn’t know was that there was a logical explanation for all of my misfortune.

I finally found out when a perspective employer said to me, ” We would love to hire you, but do you have any idea what is on your background check?” Unfortunately, that was just the beginning. It took another 5+ years of diligently pursuing the issue to get my record finally exponged. I had to get all kinds of people involved. Politicians, Identity Theft Experts, Attorneys, Victims Advocates, you name it. It totally consumed my life, don’t believe me, ask my wife. In the mean time, I was only able to get employment with jobs that did not do background checks. Mostly restaurant work, however I was  not able to accept offers of management positions due to mandatory background checks.

This was all due to someone using my name upon arrest. He did not even have Identification supporting his lies. They just took his word for it. That’s how easy it was.

You think that it couldn’t happen to you? I’m sorry to say that it can. I am not the only one. Through this journey, I have been able to meet and converse with more than a few people in similar situations. None of them knew until it was too late to do anything about it. Most of them are still fighting the system, just trying to get their records cleared. This does not even touch all of the victims of Financial Identity Theft that I hear about or talk to on a daily basis.

I would be willing to bet that you know someone that has been a victim of some type of Identity Theft or another. If you talk to your friends or co-workers, I bet that they have an Identity Theft story that happened to them or an acquaintance as well. Do you still think that it can’t happen to you?

I wouldn’t wish my nightmare upon you. Heck, I wouldn’t wish it upon my worst enemy. In this day and age, we all need to monitor our Identity. So I went on a quest to find the best Identity Monitoring system. I contacted them all. I presented my particular scenario, and asked,” Could you prevent that?” The answer was always “No, I’m sorry.” or I would just keep getting transferred to the next person, or blown off completely.

Finally, I contacted LifeLock. By this time I was pretty sure that there was no so-called “Identity Theft Protection” service that could be trusted. Their answer was also, “No, we could not protect from that.” I was about to hang up, assured that they were all frauds when he said,”BUT, we would have immediately known that it did happen. We would have had our attorney’s go to bat for you. We would have saved you 6 years of not knowing, and another6 years of fighting the system.” From there we talked and talked. Their system was explained to me in full. They are for real.

The only problem is, they can’t help you if you are not a member.

Because of my own experience, I am happy to endorse LifeLock. In turn, LifeLock has allowed me to offer a 10% discount to anyone that I refer to them. All you have to do is click on the Lifelock banner at the bottom of this page. I assure you, even though it might be a little too late for me, I now have my whole family enrolled in Lifelock. I recommend it to all of my friends. They have packages starting at as little as $10.00 a month. Do your own research, but please protect yourself, you can’t afford not to.


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Chesapeake man sues in 13-year fight to clear his name

Saturday, March 5th, 2011

By Matthew Bowers
The Virginian-Pilot
© February 26, 2011

CHESAPEAKE

John Shelby thought his new bosses at an El Paso, Texas, casino were playing around when they withdrew their job offer for him to manage three of their bars.

They weren’t.

A background check showed he was a felon, and he was supposed to be in the city jail. Right then.

“I made a joke about it,” Shelby said. ” ‘Yeah, I escape every morning to come to work.’ Because I thought they were joking.”

It’s no joke to Shelby now, after more than a decade of losing or being passed over for jobs, which Shelby said forced him to live on the streets for a while.

“I had no idea what was in store for me,” said Shelby, who lives in Chesapeake.

Shelby claims police in El Paso negligently linked his name to someone else’s criminal record in 1997 when that man gave Shelby’s name as his own.

That record pops up when prospective employers run background checks on Shelby, limiting or killing his chances at securing a job.

And that, Shelby argues, violates his civil rights by invading his privacy and ruining his ability to make a living.

More than 13 years after he lost the casino job, Shelby has a $7.5 million federal lawsuit pending against the city of El Paso. At an initial hearing in Texas on Friday, a judge allowed the case to continue and ordered the parties to develop a trial schedule, said Stephen Casey, Shelby’s Austin, Texas-based lawyer and Regent University law graduate.

Shelby didn’t know it, but his ordeal began in 1991 when, at 19, he was arrested on a charge of trespassing at his old high school, according to interviews with Shelby and Casey, court filings and other documents.

Shelby said he was there to pick up a student friend. The school district dropped the charge.

Shelby went on a stint in the Navy, and jobs such as delivery driver and bartender.

Things changed for him when the casino job came – and quickly went – in late 1997.

He learned that earlier that year, police arrested the man who gave Shelby’s name. The man had heard of Shelby through a family both knew.

Shelby and his lawyer say police added Shelby’s personal information, including Social Security and driver’s license numbers, from his 1991 file despite obvious differences in height, weight and age. They also claim in the suit that police didn’t compare fingerprints.

The man is serving a life sentence in Texas for aggravated robbery and engaging in organized criminal activity, according to Texas Department of Criminal Justice data online.

After Shelby lost the casino job, police at first told him the problem was “cleared up ” and gave him a letter stating so.

But the erroneous record lived on in various databases that background-check companies use. Shelby’s name remained listed as an alias for the other man.

Jobs became elusive. He’d get passed over and not know why. The Postal Service hired him as a carrier in Suffolk and then, according to his suit, a supervisor fired him for “dishonesty” because of his record check. Shelby had already begun orientation; instead, Shelby said, he became homeless.

Repeated calls to El Paso authorities proved fruitless, although they expunged his 1991 arrest record by January 2008. He also called elected officials. He started a website, www.goodnamegone.com.

Meanwhile, he obtained entry-level jobs, but the record thwarted promotions. He gave up his dream of becoming a kindergarten teacher. He hasn’t tried to vote, having been told the felonies on the record would forestall registration.

An El Paso police officer’s “fervent desire to ‘ fill in the blanks’ ” on an arrest report did far-reaching damage, Casey, the lawyer, wrote to El Paso officials in a September 2010 letter seeking a settlement.

“You’ve got this bell that’s been rung by the city of El Paso and it can’t be un-rung,” Casey said in an interview. “All they can do is clean up the mess.”

An El Paso police spokesman and a city spokeswoman said they couldn’t talk about Shelby’s situation because of the pending suit.

Brian Falco of San Diego previously worked with an organization that combated identity theft, and Falco has continued trying to help Shelby. He called Shelby’s situation unusual; solving such problems takes time and money, making them low priorities for busy law-enforcement officials, he said.

“Ever deal with a bureaucracy?” he asked in an interview. “If you’re wrongly installed in there, it takes an act of God to get it out of there…. Because some paperwork is messed up, you shouldn’t not be able to get a decent job.”

At age 39, Shelby delivers pizzas because that’s one of the few jobs he can land without a background check.

He hasn’t been able to save for retirement or college for his two young children. He and his wife, a saleswoman, have no health insurance. Finances are so tight, in fact, they’re moving today to Florida because they no longer can afford their Greenbrier home.

“I’ve had my moments when I’ve been straight-up depressed,” Shelby said. “It’s been a heck of a hard road.”

Shelby said he has tried looking at the past 13-plus years as a learning experience – “how to overcome adversity, maybe.”

One lesson learned, he said, has been to not tie his self-worth to a job, but instead to things like being a good father and husband.

He jokes his wife, Bethany, remains “so positive it annoys me.” But there are limits, she said.

“The main thing, really, has been watching that zest dwindle from John,” she said. “It makes me sad….

“They see it as one mistake. They don’t see it as 10 years of building a crappy resume… that affects the rest of your life.”

Both hope the lawsuit changes things.

“If this doesn’t work, I don’t know what I’m going to do,” Shelby said. “I can’t deliver pizzas all my life.”

Matthew Bowers, (757) 222-5221, matthew.bowers@pilotonline.com

FULL STORY: Identity Theft Ruins Man’s Employment Chances

Saturday, March 5th, 2011

See the video of this news story at:

http://www.ktsm.com/news/full-story-identity-theft-ruins-mans-employment-chances

By Lindsey Reiser – Multimedia Journalist
Tuesday, December 28, 2010 – 5:39pm

A man in Virginia Beach says his identity was stolen in El Paso, and now his failed background checks have prevented him from getting a job.

John Shelby had a arrest on his record in El Paso; it was a trespassing charge that he says was dropped before it went to court. But because his name and mug shot were in the system, a suspect could easily steal his identity by using his name upon arrest. And that’s exactly what he says happened.

“He didn’t have anything but my name when he was arrested,” Shelby said. He says a man named Jason Newton used his name when Newton was arrested.

“It kind of caused an identity crises for myself a little bit,” Shelby said. Years after his criminal charge in El Paso was dropped, he applied for a job, but was turned down.

“They said at that time I was in El Paso County Jail according to their background check,” he said. After some calls, Shelby thought it was taken care of.

“The officer sent me a letter and it said I had no record on file and it was all taken care of,” he said.

Shelby tried to move on, but every time he applied for a job, he was always passed up. Frustrated, Shelby turned to the El Paso records department. But they told him to hire a lawyer if he wanted his name cleared.

“That I needed to take responsibility for my own life and stop blaming them for my misfortune,” Shelby said.

“We need to have tight safeguards on this to make sure it doesn’t ruin someone’s life,” said Shelby’s attorney in Austin, Stephen Casey. Casey says several people are at fault for what’s happened to his client. But how could this have happened? Newton and Shelby have different hair colors, eye colors, heights, and weights. Casey thinks someone just pulled up Shelby’s prior arrest and didn’t verify that Newton was telling the truth.

“Originally it was the people who put in the information for the arrest report of Jason Newton,” Casey said. “They didn’t verify the information.”

Shelby’s background checks still show those arrests and he says delivering pizzas is the only job he’s been able to get.

“I gave up on school because I figure what’s the point, I’ve never had a job I feel suitable for,” Shelby said.

We’re told Newton is serving a life sentence right now in the alleged beating of a man. Shelby has filed a lawsuit against the city of El Paso for identity theft. We called the city for comment and they said they couldn’t comment because it was a police issue. We called police and they told us they could not comment, even on their procedures upon verifying someone’s identity upon arrest, until they consulted with the city attorney’s office.

Navy vet sues city over info on criminal record

Saturday, March 5th, 2011

Here is an article published by Mr. John Hall with the El Paso Times:

Navy vet sues city over info on criminal record

Posted: 12/14/2010 09:43:50 AM MST

The city of El Paso faces a multimillion-dollar lawsuit that alleges the Police Department mishandled records and personal information of a man who could not get jobs as a result.

According to the suit filed in district court last week, disabled Navy veteran John Shelby is suing the city for $7.5 million, alleging that he has lost or been denied several jobs that required background checks because the crimes of another man using his name as an alias were incorrectly attributed to him and placed on his criminal record.

The city attorney’s office declined to comment Monday, citing a standing policy not to discuss pending legal matters.

According to the suit, Shelby was arrested in 1991 on suspicion of criminal trespassing, which was dismissed.

The suit alleges that Jason Newton was arrested twice in 1997, once for robbery and a second time for burglary of a vehicle and evading arrest. The suit says that both times. Newton identified himself as John Shelby.

On both occasions, the El Paso Police Department released Newton despite the fact that he was wanted in connection with an attempted murder in Mc Kinney, Texas, the suit alleges. Newton is now serving a life sentence for his part in that crime, the suit says.

Shelby’s personal information, including his Social Security number and place of birth, was filed on the arrest records made under Newton’s alias of John Shelby.

Shelby’s attorney, Stephen Casey, maintains that instead of actually verifying Newton’s


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identity, the police imported information from Shelby’s 1991 arrest.

Due to these mistakes, Casey argues that Newton’s criminal record was essentially attributed to Shelby and, as a result, Shelby has failed a series of background checks since 1997, making him virtually unemployable.

Shelby has made several attempts to clear his record over the years and was eventually able to get Newton’s criminal history expunged from his record in 2009.

“He’s basically had to be a pizza delivery driver or work in a seedy bar for the last de cade or more,” Casey said. “This has been the focus of his life, trying to get this corrected.”

The suit charges that Shelby’s privacy was violated and that he was defamed by Police Department records.

John Hall may be reached at jhall@elpasotimes.com; 546-6371.

Press Release of My Case

Wednesday, December 15th, 2010

Press Release Issued Yesterday 10-13-2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CITY OF EL PASO SUED FOR IDENTITY THEFT

El Paso, Texas – The City of El Paso received notice of a multi-million dollar lawsuit today concerning the role of the City of El Paso Police Department (CEPPD) role in the identity theft of John Shelby.
The suit alleges that in November 1997, Shelby attempted to apply for a job in El Paso but was refused because of a background check showing he was at that time incarcerated in the El Paso city jail. Shelby followed up at the jail and discovered the police actually had in custody a man named Jason Newton.
Newton had given Shelby’s name when arrested by CEPPD. Newton knew of Shelby’s name through acquaintances and only gave Shelby’s name.  Shelby got a letter from CEPPD for any future background checks which explained he was not Newton. But the mixup did not stop there and went deeper than Shelby could possibly know at that time.
Over twelve years later, after many failed jobs, firings, and multiple periods of homelessness, all due to failed background checks, an assistant district attorney for the El Paso District Court helped Shelby get
an expunction of the criminal charges for his record. When Shelby received the paperwork back from that process in January 2009, he found out the awful truth: CEPPD had caused the identity theft.
Shelby had been arrested in 1991 and the charges were dismissed; however, his information was still within CEPPD’s system. Newton had not given any other identifying information upon arrest except Shelby’s name. CEPPD had imported Shelby’s former Texas Driver’s License Number, Social
Security Number, date of birth, height, weight, hair color, eye color, and place of birth from dismissed 1991 arrest. CEPPD had also twice released Newton under Shelby’s name despite the fact that Newton was wanted at the time for capital murder and despite having falsely identified on the
arrest sheet that the information on Newton had been verified through both Federal Bureau of Investigation and Texas Department of Public Safety databases.
Shelby, a disabled veteran who is married with young children, demands justice. “My life and that of my family have been essentially destroyed because CEPPD did not do its job. They “filled in the blanks” with no concern that all of the information was wrong.” He continues, “I’ve not been able to
get any job that requires a background check and have been fired from multiple jobs because of CEPPD’s intentional substitution of my information onto Newton’s arrest record.”
His attorney, Stephen Casey, agrees. “CEPPD is privy to such private information that for them to flippantly fill in information that is wrong on its face is intolerable. Shelby and Newton are nearly seven years apart in age, six inches different in height, forty pounds different in weight, and have
different eye color, hair color, and so there is no way CEPPD verified Newton’s fingerprints in any way.” “Few people can relate to the decades long tragedy which John Shelby has had to endure simply
because CEPPD did not do its job,” Casey added. “I would hate to think that a dismissed arrest could result in having a faulty conviction for multiple felonies.”
Shelby’s suit seeks damages in excess of seven million dollars. The City of El Paso City Council voted to deny Shelby’s claim. Shelby still believes the city should compensate him for the tragedy it caused.
CONTACT STEPHEN CASEY AT 512-238-3117 FOR QUESTIONS

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